A TRIBUTE TO TASMANIAN SCALLOPS

A TRIBUTE TO TASMANIAN SCALLOPS

There are many reasons to visit beautiful Tasmania, but perhaps the best one is to eat freshly caught scallops. Oh yes indeed. Even as far back as WWI locals complained that too many were shipped off to the mainland. However, it seems this was not the case

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A DISAPPEARING HOUSE AND WALKING TREES

A DISAPPEARING HOUSE AND WALKING TREES

This is a guest post from Warren Bishop, a direct descendant of James Smith, who built Tasmania’s famous ‘disappearing house.’ The Disappearing House at “The Corners” Conara Standing at the turnoff to St Marys at Conara, the so-called “Disappearing House” earned its name by the illusion of

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THE TASMANIAN AXEMEN LOST AT SEA

THE TASMANIAN AXEMEN LOST AT SEA

Writing in 1926, a journalist  (The Daily News, Perth) reflected on  the sport of wood chopping in the years before WWI. He appeared to have been pretty impressed by competitors from the island state. In Tasmania, in the underhand events, the axemen invariably were barefooted, and they

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A MIRACULOUS BONE GRAFT?

A MIRACULOUS BONE GRAFT?

Stephen W. O’Flaherty was a worker in a sawmill at Derby, a small community in the north-east of Tasmania. In the early 1900s he suffered a significant injury when a lever at the mill rebounded, breaking his arm in two places. It was said that he had

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TRAGEDY AT A TASMANIAN TIN MINE

TRAGEDY AT A TASMANIAN TIN MINE

My great-uncle James (Jim) Allen was a miner. At 32 he enlisted in WWI, then returned home to work in the rich Brisies tin mine at Derby, in north-eastern Tasmania. I have vague memories of my grandmother talking about relatives at Derby when I was a child,

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CANBERRA: CENTRE OF AUSTRALIA’S COLLECTIVE MEMORY

CANBERRA: CENTRE OF AUSTRALIA'S COLLECTIVE MEMORY

This piece was originally published in  The Australian newspaper it has been substantially  updated since then.  CANBERRA – THE PLANNED CAPITAL Many Australians  are   ambivalent  about  the planned city of Canberra. Its monolithic buildings stand a little too far apart in their park like surroundings, and can

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THE GRAVEL PIT PLAYGROUND

THE GRAVEL PIT PLAYGROUND

  There was a large gravel pit on the dairy farm I grew up on outside Ulverstone, in north west Tasmania.  I don’t think the income from it was huge, but it  must have been a big help to my parents when they bought the property in

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TASMANIA’S OWN ROAD RUNNERS

TASMANIA'S OWN ROAD RUNNERS

Tasmanian native hens were part of my 1950s rural childhood, but I must admit I gave them little thought.  This may be because they would  simply shoot across my vision like the  cartoon character  Roadrunner. They  are flightless, but can motor along  at up to 50 kilometres

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LES MURRAY; COWSHEDS AND CONCRETE

LES MURRAY; COWSHEDS AND CONCRETE

As a Baby Boomer I grew up with little exposure to Australian literature.  It was all English boarding school stories,  Enid Blyton and Charles Dickens. My early knowledge of poets was limited to those represented in a primary school textbook, Poems for Pleasure; Blake, Longfellow, Wordsworth, Coleridge

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Madame Sherwin; the Tasmanian Nightingale

Madame Sherwin; the Tasmanian Nightingale

Frances Amy Sherwin  (1855-1935) was one of five children, born and raised  in Tasmania’s Huon Valley. Even as a child she had a lovely voice, and dreamed of becoming a famous singer. This seemed highly unlikely, as the family struggled to make a living on a remote

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