Blue Mountains

Glenbrook; Gateway To the Blue Mountains

Glenbrook; Gateway To the Blue Mountains

Recently I conducted a little social history  survey on how the various towns and villages of the Blue Mountains are perceived.  Do they have a distinct character?  Well certainly most of them do. Most surprising of all to me was that Glenbrook is considered by many to

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HONEYSUCKLE HAVEN

HONEYSUCKLE HAVEN

  Lonicera nidita is a type of honeysuckle used in topiary and hedging. It’s often known as box honeysuckle. Tiny birds such as blue wrens love to hop about in it…… and  on it, searching for bugs. It will cope with frequent, light clipping and becomes dense

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THE QUEEN VISITS THE BLUE MOUNTAINS

THE QUEEN VISITS THE BLUE MOUNTAINS

‘I did but see her passing by…’   Prime Minister of Australia R.M. Menzies. (1963) Early in February 1954, a group of WWI diggers travelled down to Sydney to see the young Queen Elizabeth. She was  on her first  tour of Australia, following the coronation.  Describing the  occasion

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Spiders are not so scary….honestly.

Spiders are not so scary....honestly.

I can’t say that I like spiders, but I have become quite fascinated with the ones I see in my garden here in the Blue Mountains.  Of course most of them I don’t actually see….only their intricate webs. People on an Australian spider ID site  told me the

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BANKSIA SERRATA; WEIRD AND WONDERFUL!

BANKSIA SERRATA; WEIRD AND WONDERFUL!

Specimens  of  of the Australian native Banksia serrata  were  collected by Sir Joseph Banks in  1770 and later named for him. They are funny, gnarled trees that look ancient long before their time (rather like weather beaten Australian gardeners). Serrata refers to the  tough, saw edged  leaves;   Their

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MOUNTAIN DEVIL!

MOUNTAIN DEVIL!

A favourite shrub in my woodland  garden is the spikey  Australian native shrub  Lambertia Formosa.  It was once known  as  the honey flower, but today is more usually called Mountain Devil. It is related to the proteas. The shrubs grow to about 2 metres. They are great

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Local Hero; the Lithgow Stove

Local Hero; the Lithgow Stove

Engineer  George Morris arrived in Australia in the 1890s. He settled in Sydney, marrying Priscilla Walker in 1903.  The couple then moved to Lithgow, in the Blue Mountains, where  George was  initially employed at the town’s blast furnace. In 1910 he left, to open a foundry in

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CHRISTMAS IN BLACKHEATH

CHRISTMAS IN BLACKHEATH

CHRISTMAS IS NIGH       As Christmas approaches I love looking back at seasonal celebrations in my  Blue Mountains village of Blackheath. The following is from The Lithgow Mercury in 1909; There was very little stir here during Christmas, and everything passed off quietly. On Boxing

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THE LITHGOW PRAM PUSHERS

THE LITHGOW PRAM PUSHERS

Dave McSorley was a  local barber in Lithgow. He was also a heavy-weight boxer, and consummate showman. He once wagered that he could clean shave  1,000 men without a break. In the end he ran out of  bristling chins, but still managed 420 shaves in 54½ hours,

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SORROW, STRIFE AND STEEL IN THE HEART

SORROW, STRIFE  AND STEEL IN THE HEART

BLAST FURNACE SPELLS START OF THE STEEL INDUSTRY On May 13 1907, the Lithgow Blast Furnace , built by William Sandford Ltd., was officially opened by the Premier of New South Wales, Sir Joseph Carruthers. It was essentially the birth of Australia’s steel industry, and a day

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