BLACKHEATH DUCK POND

Duck pond at Blackheath

Blackheath duck pond is close enough to my garden to be my personal water feature. Hardly  a day goes by without me wandering past it.

The traction engine below was used to excavate the original dams, which evolved into the  pond. The dams were used to hold water for steam trains on the Great Western Rail Line.

 

Traction engine in Blackheath park.

Preserved in the park.

Many years ago the council begged some mallard ducks from Bathurst to stock the pond…and nearly went broke feeding them on wheat. They would have been better off waiting for the beautiful native wood ducks to arrive and multiply.

Wood duck family

 

Wood duck on Blackheath duck pond

Mother wood duck on golden pond,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This Little Pied Cormorant is a regular visitor. Never seems to catch much as far as I can tell. Maybe it eats underwater.

Pied Cormorant

Admiring the azalea reflections in spring.

PIed cormorant drying off

Hung out to dry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seems to live the most lonely and tedious life. It sits at the same spot 90% of the time, on a little wooden ‘landing’. I have never seen any sign of a partner. No wonder  he (or she)  often looks fed up.

Pied cormant at Blackheath duck pond

Looking aggrieved.

The pond is surrounded by trees, many of them deciduous.

 

Duck on Blackheath pond

Foraging among the leaves.

 

All too soon, winter arrives at the pond.

 

Blackheath duck pond.

Play of light in winter.

View through the old cherry tree.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The temperature creeps lower and lower…..

 

Duck in winter.

That does look cold.

Those frosty morning arrive, adding another form of  beauty,

Frost covered leaves

Jack Frost visits dying leaves.

In mid winter the pond actually freezes over. Look, someone ‘tested the waters’ with a tennis ball.  Mind you, the Wimbledon final was on the night before I took this shot, so it might have been a wild shot from a very big hitter.

Tennis ball on frozen Blackheath duck pond.

The big freeze.

Takes all day to thaw.

Ducks on icy Blackheath pond.

Demarkation line.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s only July, but in the bare branches of the cherry trees blue wrens sit among buds that are already swelling.

Blue wren at Blackheath duck pond.

If winter’s here can spring be far behind?The wood ducks have paired up and will soon be looking for a tree hollow to nest in. Eventually, another little brood will fledge and be  escorted to the pond.

Mr and Mrs W. Duck.

 

Wood duck family

Careful now little ones!

 

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