SNAP, CRACKLE, POP AT THE ‘COPHA’ CABANA

SNAP, CRACKLE, POP AT THE 'COPHA' CABANA

KEEP SOME COPHA IN THE CUPBOARD There is an Australian urban myth that Kellogs invented Copha for the express purpose of making chocolate crackles. Well let’s explode that for a start.   The advertisement  below appeared in the Women’s Weekly in December 1937.  It is the first known mention

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WHISTLING AN ODE TO THE GUM LEAF

WHISTLING AN ODE TO THE GUM LEAF

More on gum leaf playing further down, but meanwhile, look how beautiful the leaves can be; We Australians love gum leaves.  Expat Aussies can be reduced to tears by a whiff of their aroma.  Campers in the bush  put them into billy tea……for the flavor, but even

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WILLIAM WALL’S WHALE, A CATCH FOR THE MUSEUM!

WILLIAM WALL'S WHALE, A CATCH FOR THE MUSEUM!

Irish born Mr  William Sheridan Wall served as Curator of the Australian Museum in Sydney during  the 1840s and 50s.  He personally collected and preserved many native birds, but his greatest legacy to the institution was a creature from the deep. On December 5 1849 the schooner Thistle

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THE LOVELY LAMINGTONS

THE  LOVELY LAMINGTONS

 MORE THAN JUST A CHOCOLATE CAKE, MATE! Ever heard of a lamington cocktail? Sounds good to me. If there is one culinary icon in Australia that ‘out-icons’ the pavlova it is  surely  the lamington.    We all know that the wretched Kiwis claim the pavlova (which is a lot of

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MR McGINTY & TASMANIAN GOLD

MR McGINTY & TASMANIAN GOLD

  In  1883, James McGinty and his  two  prospecting partners  found what is still the  largest gold nugget ever found in Tasmania.  It was discovered at Rocky River, near Corinna on the  wild west coast. It weighed 243ozs and was valued at £6,000. Below is an  image  of the nugget  on

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Dolly Pegs

Dolly Pegs

A SMALL PIECE OF WOOD Apparently wooden ‘dolly pegs’ were originally  hand made by Gypsies in the UK, who sold them door to door.  Sometimes they were carved from hedgerow wood, sometimes they were just a couple of sticks  bound together with strips of tin. In Tasmania 

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Blowin’ in the wind; the Hills Hoist.

Blowin' in the wind; the Hills Hoist.

HUNG OUT TO DRY! Baby boomers like me may have memories of old ‘prop’ clothes lines. They had been around for generations,  although there was an attempt to improve on them as early as  1889. An Australian invented a device for carrying a double line, which could be elevated

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