LOVE YOUR BONNETS, GRANNY! (Aquilegias)

LOVE YOUR BONNETS, GRANNY! (Aquilegias)

How very beautiful are old-fashioned aquilegias, or colombines.   They are also known as granny’s bonnets. Bees love them.                   Here is an interesting piece on the plant’s name, published in 1927; A new explanation of the derivation of

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THE OLD CHERRY TREES OF BLACKHEATH

THE OLD CHERRY TREES OF BLACKHEATH

From the Lithgow Mercury on October 12 1953; In 1953, the women residents of Park Avenue in the Blue Mountains village of Blackheath decided their street needed a little beautification.  Let’s face it, the very  word ‘avenue’ suggests a  tree lined promenade.  Perhaps they also felt a

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SPRING WALK TO BLACKHEATH VILLAGE

SPRING WALK TO BLACKHEATH VILLAGE

A few days of rain and mist followed by two warm, sunny days and voila……it’s SPRING! Impossible to stay inside. Let’s pop up to Blackheath village. Mr and Mrs Wood Duck were taking a stroll as well. Soon they will be looking for a tree hollow to

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BEES AND A BRAVE BLACKHEATHEN BEAR

BEES AND A BRAVE  BLACKHEATHEN  BEAR

Hello, from me….Editor Des of Blackheath. We have so many bees at our place here in the Blue Mountains. I know, because I  help my guardian Pauline Conolly look after the garden.   Or  rather she helps me…ha ha. Of course the bees are asleep now, keeping

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The Love of Lavender

The Love of Lavender

I’ve always loved lavender. When I was a child  in Tasmania we used to buy quaint cardboard dolls with muslin aprons full of the dried English variety. My mother didn’t grow it as far as I remember, but the island state  is home to the  remarkable Bridestowe 

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Through the camera lens.

Through the camera lens.

ALWAYS CARRY A CAMERA Owning a small ‘point and shoot’ camera has transformed the way I look at  and appreciate my Blue Mountains  garden. The play of light, the beauty of a detail suddenly observed. It means that my ‘matron’s rounds’ are slower, but  they are also

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THE STIRRINGS OF SPRING

THE STIRRINGS OF SPRING

]  It was that period in the vernal quarter when we may suppose the Dryads to be waking for the season. The vegetable world begins to move and swell and the saps to rise, till in the completest silence of lone gardens and trackless plantations, where everything

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